integer literals编程 代写、代做Java/C++编程语言

SU 2019 LAB 2: Character and integer literals, number systems, array and character arrays, operators Released: Sep 16. Due: Sep 23 (M) 11:59pm 0 Problem 0 Number bases • Visit the website www.cleavebooks.co.uk/scol/calnumba.htm to play wi...



SU 2019 LAB 2: Character and integer literals, number

systems, array and character arrays, operators

Released: Sep 16. Due: Sep 23 (M) 11:59pm

0 Problem 0 Number bases

• Visit the website www.cleavebooks.co.uk/scol/calnumba.htm to play with

different bases of integer representations. Enter a valid number in any base and you will see

the representations in all the other bases. For this course, we focus on Binary (base 2), Octal

(base 8) and Hexadecimal (base 16) representations. The [] beside each base indicates the

valid symbols for the base. For example, valid symbols for base 8 are [0,1,2,3,4,5,6,7]

whereas valid symbols for base 16 are [0…9,A,B,C,D,E,F]. Entering 38 in base 8 or 4H in base

16 and observe how the calculator refuses to work for you. Enter 37 in base 8, or 31 in base

10 and calculate it. Convince yourself that results in binary, octal and hexadecimal do have

decimal value 31.

• To see how a 32 bits binary representation looks like, and also how negative numbers are

represented in binary, please download, compile and run the Java program Binary.java.

(In terminal, compile the program using javac Binary.java, and then run the program

using java Binary) The program first demonstrates that for an integer number (stored

internally in binary), there are four ways (Decimal, Binary, Hex and Octal) in Java to denote

the integer number in code. In C there are three ways (Decimal, Hex and Octal), as there is

no Binary literal in C.

This program then converts integer input from stdin, which is assumed to be a decimal

integer literal, into its 32 bits binary representation, which is the way integers are stored

internally in memory. You can enter negative numbers to examine how negative number is

represented using 2’s complement. Convince yourself with the “flip then +1” rule of 2’s

complement. The program also shows the Oct and Hex values, using printf with specific

conversion specifications %d, %o and %x(%X). Stop the program by entering -10000.

• Download, compile and run the C program binaryFun0.c. Similar to the Java program

above, this program reads in a decimal integer literal, and then outputs the integer value in

Decimal, Octal, and Hex, using printf with specific conversion specifications %d, %o

and %x(%X) respectively.

Displaying binary representation, however, is not directly supported in printf, as C does

not support integer literal in binary. In the next lab you will see an enhanced version of this

program, which uses bitwise operations to display binary in C. Bitwise operations will be

covered in lecture 3.

No submissions for problem 0.

1. Problem A Character literals

1.1 Specification

Write an ANSI-C program that reads input from the Standard input, and then outputs the

processed information on the Standard output.

2

Each user input contains an integer, followed by a blank and then a character. If the character

does represent a digit, e.g., '3', (how to check?), then the program outputs the sum of the

entered integer and the numerical value that this character represents (how to get the

numerical value of a character such as '3'?). If the character does not represent a digit, e.g., 'A',

then the program outputs that the character is not a digit.

The program continues until the input integer is -10000 (and is followed by a blank and any one

character).

1.2 Implementation

• name your program lab2A.c

• keep on reading and processing input, until an integer -10000 is read.

• use scanf ("%d %c", ..) to read inputs.

• define a ‘Boolean’ function isDigit(char c) to determine if c represents a digit. We

mentioned in class that ANSI-C does not have a type `boolean’, instead ANSI-C uses 0 to

represent false, and uses non-zero integer to represent true. So, as a general practice in C,

your function should return a non-zero integer number (usually 1) if c is a digit and returns

0 otherwise.

Note that you should NOT use library functions here. Moreover, you should not write

something like if (c=='0' || c=='1' || c=='2' || c=='3' … c=='9'.

Instead, use the single-statement ‘idiom’ discussed in class to examine if c is a digit char.

• Note that in getting the numerical value of a digit character such as '3', you should NOT

use if (c=='0')… elseif(c=='1')… elseif (c=='2')….

elseif(c=='3') … Instead, use the one-statement ‘trick’ that we discussed in class.

• put the definition (implementation) of function isDigit after your main function.

• display the prompt and output as shown below.

1.3 Sample Inputs/Outputs: (ONE blank line between each interaction/iteration):

red 338 % gcc –Wall lab2A.c -o lab2a

red 339 % lab2a

Enter an integer and a character separated by blank: 12 c

Character 'c' does not represent a digit

Enter an integer and a character separated by blank: 12 9

Character '9' represents a digit. Sum of 12 and 9 is 21

Enter an integer and a character separated by blank: 100 8

Character '8' represents a digit. Sum of 100 and 8 is 108

Enter an integer and a character separated by blank: 120 !

Character '!' does not represent a digit

Enter an integer and a character separated by blank: -10000 a

red 340 %

Submit your program by issuing submit 2031B lab2 lab2A.c

2. Problem B Character literals

2.1 Specification

3

Write an ANSI-C program that uses getchar to read from the Standard input, and outputs

(duplicates) the characters to the Standard output. For each input character that is a lower-case

letter (how to check?), converts it into the corresponding upper case letter in the output (how

to convert?). The program continues to read and output until EOF is entered.

2.2 Implementation

You might want to start with the copy.c program presented in textbook (Ch 1) and slides

(Week 2). Observe that although the copy program calls putchar or printf in every iteration

of the loop (after every getchar), the output is not displayed in every iteration, rather, is

displayed only after a whole line is read in. This is related to the buffer used by the system.

Specifically, instead of executing putchar or printf for every getchar, the system buffer

stores the chars that are read in, and executes putchar or printf only after a new line

character '\n' is read in.

• name your program lab2B.c

• use getchar() and a loop to read characters.

• use putchar() or printf()to print the input characters on the standard output.

• In checking and converting characters, do NOT use any C library functions. Do your own

checking and conversion. Moreover, you should NOT use if c=='A' c=='B' c=='C'

c=='D' … c=='Z'. Instead, use the single-statement ‘idiom’ discussed in class. Also for

portability concerns, avoid using a particular number.slower(), toupper().

2.3 Sample Inputs/Outputs (from Standard input):

red 308 % gcc –Wall –o lab2b lab2B.c

red 309 % lab2b

Hello The World

HELLO THE WORLD

How Old Are You?

HOW OLD ARE YOU?

I am 22, and THANKs!

I AM 22, AND THANKS!

^D (press Ctrl and D)

red 310 %

2.4 Sample Inputs/Outputs (from redirected input file):

Using your favorite text editor, create a text file my_input.txt that contains

hEllo

How Are You!

I Am Good and THAnKs!

See you later.

red 311 % lab2b < my_input.txt

HELLO

HOW ARE YOU!

I AM GOOD AND THANKS!

SEE YOU LATER.

red 312 %

Submit your program by issuing submit 2031B lab2 lab2B.c

4

3. Problem C Array and Character array (“Strings”)

3.1 Specification

Download program lab2C.c, compile and run the program.

• Observe that we use marco #define SIZE 20 to define a constant, avoiding magic

numbers. This is one of the two common ways to define a constant in C. When the program

is compiled, the pre-processor replaces every occurrence of SIZE with 20. (We will talk

more on C pre-processor later in class).

• Observe the strange values for elements of array k. Run it again and you might see the

change of the strange values. The key point is that, in ANSI-C an array element is not given

an initial value such as 0 in Java, rather a garbled value that is randomly generated is given.

Modify the declaration int k[SIZE]; to int k[SIZE] = {3,5}; Compile and run it

again, what do you see? The key point here is that if you specify initial values for one or

more of the first few elements of the array, the rest elements of array gets initial value 0.

Based on this ‘trick’, and without using loop, modify the declaration of k so that k is

initialized to all 0s, as shown in the sample output below.

• Observe that char array msg is declared with no explicit size and was initialized with a 11

character string literal "Hello World". The memory size is allocated by the compiler based

on the initial value. Here the memory size allocated by compiler is 12 bytes. Observe how

sizeof operator is used to get the memory size of array. (When used on a variable, we

can write either sizeof msg or sizeof(msg)-- the latter form give people the illusion

that sizeof is a library function but actually it is an operator.) Why 12 bytes for 11

character string? The extra 1 byte is used to store the null character '\0'. On the other hand,

a library function call of strlen, which returns the ‘length’ (# of content characters) of

string, returns 11. (We will discuss string library functions later in class.)

Complete the program by printing out all the elements of array msg, first the encoding

(index of the character in the ASCII table), and then the character itself, as shown in the

sample output below.

Observe the special (invisible) character whose index is 0, denoted as '\0', at the end of the

array. '\0' is added automatically for you at the end of the array. For more information

about “strings”, see section 5.2 below.

• Complete the program by printing out all the elements of array msg2, first the index of the

character in the ASCII table, and then the character itself, as shown in the sample output

below. Observe that the complier appends '\0' for the rest of space.

Observe that for msg2 which is declared to be a size 20 array and is initialized with literal

"Hello World", the memory size is 20 bytes, as it declared to be. Despite its larger memory

size, however, same as for msg, the library function call of strlen returns 11, and printf

also prints Hello World. The key point here is that these library functions treat the first

'\0' (from left to right) as the end of the string, ignoring values thereafter.

• Remove the comments that around the last 6 lines near the end of the program. This block

of code demonstrates that we can use scanf and %s to read in strings from stdin and store

in an char array. Observe that it is msg3, not &msg3, that is passed to scanf as argument.

That is, when passing a char array variable to scanf, no & is used. This is a big topic that we

will learn later in class. 

5

Complete the program by printing out all the elements of array msg3, first the index of the

character in ASCII table, and then the character itself, as shown in the sample output below.

Compile and run the program, entering a string with no more than 19 characters (why 19?)

and without space, such as Helloworld. Observe that the input characters are stored in

the array, with a '\0' appended after the last character d. Also observe that the complier

may also append '\0's or some other random values for the rest of space. In either case,

observe that for msg3 the memory size is 20 bytes, as it declared to be. On the other hand,

the library function call of strlen returns 10, and printf prints Helloworld.

Re-run the program, and enter a string with spaces, e.g., Hello World, and observe that

only Hello is stored in the array. Accordingly, printf prints Hello and strlen

returns 5.

This exemplifies an issue with reading string simply using scanf("%s"): it reads input

character by character until it encounters a white-space character or a new line character.

Thus if the input string contains white spaces it cannot be fully read in. (You are not asked to

fix this.) Another issue of simply using scanf("%s")is that there is no way to detect

when the argument array is full. Thus, it may store characters pass the end of the array,

causing undefined behavior (don’t try that). Later we will see other ways to read in a string

that contains spaces, and control the input length.

3.2 Sample Inputs/Outputs

red 361 % gcc lab2C.c -o lab2c

red 362 % lab2c

msg: Hello world

memory size of msg: 12 (bytes)

strlen of msg: 11

msg2: Hello world

memory size of msg2: 20 (bytes)

strlen of msg2: 11

Enter a string: Helloworld

msg3: Helloworld

memory size of msg3: 20 (bytes)

strlen of msg3: 10

Submit your program using submit 2031B lab2 lab2C.c

4. Problem D Char conversion, Integer Array

4.1 Specification

Write an ANSI-C program that takes input from Standard in, and outputs the occurrence count

of digits 0-9 in the inputs.

You might see other random values from

msg3[11]~msg3[19]. That is okay.

We should not care what they are, as these

values are always ignored by printf() and

string-related library functions, such as

strlen()

7

4.2 Implementation

• name your program lab2D.c

• use getchar to read from the standard input. After reading a digit character, the program

updates the corresponding counter for the digit. The program continues to read until EOF is

entered. Then outputs the occurrence count of each digit in the input.

• do NOT use 10 individual counters for the digit characters. Instead, use an integer array as

the counters. That is, maintains an array of 10 counters.

• when a character is read in, if it is a digit character, then how to find the corresponding

counter? Don’t use statement such as if (c=='0') … else if (c=='1') …

else if (c=='2')… else… Instead, use the single-statement “idiom” discussed in

class, which takes advantage of the index of the character to figure out the corresponding

counter in the array.

Sample Inputs/Outputs: (download the input file input2D.txt)

red 368 % gcc -Wall lab2D.c -o lab2d

red 369 % lab2d

YorkU LAS EECS

^D (press Ctrl and D)

red 370 % lab2d

EECS2031B 2019F

ACE0001

^D (press Ctrl and D)

red 371 % lab2d

EECS3421 this is good 3

address 500 yu266074

423Dk

^D (press Ctrl and D)

You can ignore the warning messages.

red 372 % lab2d < input2D.txt

red 373 %

Submit your program by issuing submit 2031B lab2 lab2D.c

5. Problem E Reading and manipulating character arrays

5.1 Specification

Write an ANSI-C program that reads from standard input a word (string with no spaces) followed

by a character, and then outputs the word, the number of characters in the word, and the index

of the character in the word.

5.2 Useful information

Note that C has no string type, so when you declare literal "hello", the internal

representation is an array of characters, terminated by a special null character ‘\0’, which is

added for you automatically. So char helloArr[]= "hello" will give helloArr a

representation of

'h' 'e' 'l' 'l' 'o' '\0' , which has size 6 bytes, not 5.

As shown in question C, one way to read a word from the standard input is to use scanf,

which is passed as argument a “string” variable. When using scanf("%s", arrayName),

the trailing character '\0' is added for you.

5.3 Implementation

• download program lab2E.c and start from there.

• define a char array to hold the input word. Assume each input word contains no more than

20 characters (so what is the minimum capacity the array should be declared to have?).

• use scanf ("%s %c", … ) to read the word and char.

• define a function int length(char word[]) which returns the number of

characters in word (excluding the trailing character ‘\0’). This function is similar to

strlen(s) C library function shown earlier, and s.length() method in Java. You

should NOT call strlen library function in your function. Write your own version of strlen.

9

• define a function int indexOf(char word[], char c) which returns the index

(position of the first occurrence) of c in word. Return -1 if c does not occur in word. This

function is similar to s.indexof()method in Java.

• keep on reading until a word "quit" is read in, followed by any character. In checking

the terminating condition, word == "quit" will not work as arrays cannot be

compared directly.

You are provided with a “boolean” function int isQuit(char word[])which

intends to check whether argument word is "quit", but this function has a flaw. Try to

discover the flaw, and fix the bug, or, write your implementation, and then use the

function in main().

Don’t use C library function here. such

as strcmp).

5.4 Sample Inputs/Outputs: (output is on a single line)

red 308 % gcc –Wall lab2E.c –o lab2e

red 309 % lab2e

"hello" contains 5 input characters, but the size of it is 6 (bytes)

Enter a word and a character separated by blank: hello x

Input word is "hello". Contains 5 characters. Index of 'x' in it is

-1

Enter a word and a character separated by blank: hello l

Input word is "hello". Contains 5 characters. Index of 'l' in it is

2

Enter a word and a character separated by blank: beautifulWord u

Input word is "beautifulWord". Contains 13 characters. Index of 'u'

in it is 3

Enter a word and a character separated by blank: quit x

red 310 %

Submit your program by issuing submit 2031B lab2 lab2E.c

6. Increment and Decrement Operators

As discussed in class, C and other modern languages such as Java, C++ all support increment and

decrement operators ++ and --. These operators can be used as prefix or postfix operators,

appearing before or after a variable.

Download program IncreDecre.c, compile and run it. Observe that,

• the first two printf statements, one after x++ and one after ++x, both output 2. Do you

understand why? This is because ++x does pre-increment, incrementing x ‘immediately’ ,

and x++ does post-increment, incrementing x ‘later’ – at some point after the current

statement but before the next statement. So in both case when the printf statement is

executed, x has already been incremented.

• Since post-increment x++ increments x ’later’ – some point after the current statement and

before the next statement, the two printf statement printf("%d", x++) and

printf("%d",++x) produce different results. In particular, since x++ increments x after 

10

the current function call, printf("%d", x++) outputs the value before the increment

happens, whereas printf("%d", ++x) output the value after the increment happens.

In both cases, the printf statements after these two printf statements both output 2 as x has

been incremented at that point.

• When other operators such as assignment operators are involved, the result are also

different.

o y = x++ will assign y the un-incremented value of x, as x will be incremented after

the assignment statement.

o On the other hand, y=++x will assign y the incremented value of x, as x is incremented

immediately, before the assignment is executed.

• By using ++ and -- operators judiciously, code for traversing arrays can become succulent, as

shown in the last block of the code.

Download the Java version of program IncreDecre.java, compile and run it, and observe

the same result as in C (so in this course you will be improving your Java too, as I promised :)

No submission for this question.

In summary, for lab2 you should submit the following files:

lab2A.c lab2B.c lab2C.c lab2D.c lab2E.c

You may want to issue submit -l 2031B lab2 to get a list of files that you have

submitted.

Common Notes


All submitted files should contain the following header:

/***************************************

* EECS2031B – Lab2 *

* Author: Last name, first name *

* Email: Your email address *

* EECS_num: Your EECS login username *

* York Student #: Your student number *

****************************************/

In addition, all programs should follow the following guidelines:

• Include the stdio.h library in the header of your .c files.

• Use /* */ to comment your program. You are not encouraged to use //.

• Assume that all inputs are valid (no error checking is required, unless

asked to do so).

Lower case L


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